Roads deaths rise in Scotland in 2014

Final statistics for 2014 confirm that 200 people were killed on Scotland’s roads in 2014, while the number of people seriously injured rose by 2% to 1,699.

Derek Mackay, Scotland’s transport minister, has announced a review of  progress towards delivering 2020 casualty reduction targets after national statistics this week confirmed a 16% increase in road deaths in 2014.

The final statistics for 2014 confirm the provisional data which revealed that 200 people were killed on Scotland’s roads in 2014, while the number of people seriously injured rose by 2% to 1,699.

As a result, the Strategic Partnership Board has opened a review of progress towards delivering Scotland’s Road Safety Framework to 2020 which has the ultimate vision of “a future where no-one is killed on Scotland’s roads”.   

Derek Mackay said: “This (review) is focussing on priority areas of speed and motorcyclists, younger and older drivers, and cyclists and pedestrians.  It will help maintain momentum as we work towards meeting our challenging road casualty reduction targets over the next five years to 2020 and beyond.”

In contrast to deaths and serious injuries,  total casualties fell by 2% year on year, from 11,504 to 11,268, while child casualties fell by 3% to 1,034.

Mr Mackay added: “These statistics, which confirm the provisional figures published in June, demonstrate that while some progress is being made in our long-term efforts to reduce casualties on Scotland’s roads there is more work to do.

“Every fatality is a tragedy for the families and lives affected. The increase in the number of people killed and seriously injured on our roads in 2014 is disappointing but the number of overall casualties is at an all-time low and we can learn lessons from that as we move forward.

“Scotland is taking the lead in the introduction of new measures to reduce the number of people hurt on our roads, with a reduced drink driving limit and the A9 average speed camera system.  

“All aspects of safety are being considered, significant investment is being made to improve safety for cyclists and we have recently published guidance encouraging councils to implement 20 mph zones in residential areas to help slow down traffic there.”

 

Our Partners

Our Partners